Skip to content

🎵 Perfectly Out Of Time

Apple Music forced me to take notice of Stray Fossa and I’m grateful for it.

Robert Rackley
Robert Rackley
1 min read
🎵 Perfectly Out Of Time

Stray Fossa is a band that Apple Music kept pushing on me until I realized that I really liked them. Combining hushed tones and gentle atmospherics with chillwave sensibilities, they appeal perfectly to mid-life me. At this period in my existence, I'm looking backward and forward in equal measure. Music that contains a sense of restrained nostalgia with a nod to retro-futurism speaks to where my mind finds itself. I can imagine walking through an urban landscape with ear buds in, going from classic architecture to the most modern of skyscrapers and beholding all with a fascination brought about by realizing harmony in contradiction.

Stray Fossa picks up the baton from Small Black in making rhythms with diminutive keyboards and baselines that comfortably bounce the songs along. Breathy vocals bring to mind Cigarettes After Sex. The band guides the listener through understated verses and choruses that could serve as anthems for the contentedly indifferent.


Stray Fossa's new album Closer Than We'll Ever Know is out  6/3 on Born Losers records.

noiseFriday Night Video

Robert Rackley

Robert is an Orthodox Christian, software dev manager, inveterate notetaker, aspiring minimalist and paper airplane mechanic.


Related Posts

Members Public

Flux Observer

A podcast idea that has me hooked.

Flux Observer
Members Public

American Shoegaze

The recent piece on the new wave of American shoegaze in Stereogum was nothing if not exhaustive. Spanning obscure sub-genres and scenes, it shone a light on some of the mostly heavier U.S. based bands carrying on the tradition of outfits like Catherine Wheel and Ringo Deathstarr. The piece

American Shoegaze
Members Public

Rock and Roll As Youth Culture

I used to have a well-worn VHS cassette of Sonic Youth's tour video, 1991: The Year Punk Broke. It featured a just-experiencing-stardom phase of Nirvana, but that wasn't the reason I watched it over and over. I was more interested in the Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr. performances that were

Rock and Roll As Youth Culture